Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing

Fiction

Carry You

Dec, 11 2018 | no responses

The war has continued for so long now that an entire generation has never known a time that we didn’t have soldiers in the Middle East. It’s depressing and easy to forget—two reasons (but not the only reasons) that Glori Simmons’s latest story collection, Carry You, is so important.

Jaws of Life

Dec, 10 2018 | no responses

Laura Leigh Morris’s tales from the fictional town of Brickton, West Virginia give readers a bird’s-eye view into a world that feels at times economically and socially left behind.

Unnatural Habitats and Other Stories

Dec, 06 2018 | no responses

What you have here is a collection of loosely connected stories set in northern Arkansas, full of characters motivated, to a large degree, by their own unscrupulousness. They are hardscrabble, morally questionable, and sometimes even violent people. They are also supremely entertaining.

Indian Horse

Nov, 27 2018 | no responses

With his 220-page story of Saul Indian Horse, Wagamese delivers a near-perfect analogy to the history of the First Nation peoples of Canada.

Aisha and the Good for Nothing Cat

Nov, 14 2018 | no responses

Numbers can get you places. They are like airplanes and bicycles, buses and trains. They can tell you how much you weigh and what your temperature is. They can tell you about the cost of some things and the balance of others, like ratios of sugar to flour in a recipe for cake. They can explain the laws of motion or the passing of time, the aerodynamics of specific birds based on their wing structure, why the lift of a seagull is different from that of a hawk, or an owl, or a duck. They explain why she herself cannot fly, and can prove which girl can run fastest from palm tree to palm tree because a stopwatch doesn’t lie. Numbers prove what is there in front of your eyes, what you want to see and what you wish were not true.

Let Us Now Speak of Extinction

Sep, 24 2018 | no responses

Containing over two hundred and thirty exceedingly short works of fiction, with very few exceeding a page in length and most no longer than a paragraph, Keith consistently manages to make each story distinctive and fully formed.

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