Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing

x3poem

Walking Poetry: An Interview with Poet Lucien Darjeun Meadows

Feb, 05 2021 | no responses

Lucien Darjeun Meadows is a writer of English, German, and Cherokee ancestry from the Appalachian Mountains. An AWP Intro Journals Project winner, Lucien has received fellowships from the Academy of American Poets, American Alliance of Museums, National Association for Interpretation, and University of Denver, where he is pursuing his PhD. C.E. Janecek: You’ve written multiple […]

An Interview with Colorado Review Contributor and Poet Sawako Nakayasu

Dec, 12 2019 | no responses

Of the poems published in the fall 2019 issue of Colorado Review, editorial assistant Jordan Osborne was most struck by Sawako Nakayasu’s “Ten Girls Stepping Into and Out of the Light.” Jordan was immediately curious about the world and mind in which the poem was created, drawn into a conversation with the piece about identity […]

Looking toward Spring with Place-Based Writing

Mar, 14 2019 | one response

By Colorado Review Editorial Assistant Jennifer Anderson If I have often been drawn to place-based writing as a way to travel from one locale to another through the nuances of language, then this winter I have been drawn to writing that evokes the liminal imaginary of being caught or pulled between places, between ways of […]

On Love Poetry

Feb, 13 2019 | no responses

By Colorado Review Associate Editor Daniel Schonning For most of us, the pitfalls associated with writing a modern love poem are nearly too many to count. On one side: the saccharine, the sentimental, the end-rhymed and metrical. On the other: the woe-filled; the creepy; the self-obsessed, erotic magnum opus. Somewhere between exists the razor’s edge […]

Muriel Rukeyser and the Legacy of Documentary Poetry

Oct, 23 2018 | no responses

Using trial transcripts, witness testimonies, interviews, medical descriptions, and more, Rukeyser documents a nonlinear account of the industrial disaster through voices both real and imagined. Throughout, she never loses sight of the potential problematics of documentary poetry (voyeurism, appropriation, etc.) and this inquiry into her own method is an integral part of the poem.