Colorado State University Center for Literary Publishing

Fiction

The Lost Daughter Collective

Jun, 14 2018 | no responses

With The Lost Daughter Collective, Lindsey Drager positions herself next to innovative writers like Rikki Ducornet, Aimee Bender, and Donald Barthelme, who have used fables and folktales to achieve an ineffable effect.

Christmas in July

May, 09 2018 | no responses

Parker ably brings us close to the beauty and meaning in ordinary people and simple lives.

Touring

Apr, 27 2018 | no responses

When I moved into my dorm freshman year, I brought my mother’s box of Daylight Savings memorabilia with me and hid it under my bed. I loaded those CDs onto iTunes on my computer and listened to them over and over with my headphones plugged in, trying to figure out some clue to who my mother had been. The music revealed nothing; it was empty, meaningless pop, and I could not understand why she had been such a fan. I desperately wanted to know her in the way a daughter should grow to know her mother, but I’d only known her as a little girl who looked admiringly at the person who fed and burped me, who sang me to sleep.

Voices Underwater

Apr, 27 2018 | no responses

“You girls are so lucky you get to be Stephanie’s helpers this summer,” our mothers said as they dropped us off that first day late in June. “Can you believe it? You girls are going to be working for the greatest tennis player in America.”

Petites Suites

Apr, 12 2018 | no responses

Each little piece in the suite also bears a pertinent musical title, written in French, indicating the instruments to perform them and offering intriguing hints about the theme and tone.

Underground Fugue

Apr, 09 2018 | no responses

Readers will be captivated by the book’s details . . . the vivid portrayals of Amir’s urban explorations, which take him to London’s forbidden places, whether underground, at street level or high over the city. The book’s closing scene at the famous Battersea power station is breathtaking.

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